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[untitled]

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00:30:00

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San Francisco, CA, USA

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Comcast Cable

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Channel 89 (615 MHz)

VIDEO CODEC
mpeg2video

AUDIO CODEC
ac3

PIXEL WIDTH
544

PIXEL HEIGHT
480

TOPIC FREQUENCY

Us 12, San Francisco 9, The City 2, David Chiu 1, Lee 1, Taylor 1, Wiener 1, Wendy 1, Hamilton 1, Beaver 1, Olague 1, Malia Cohen 1, Wiley 1, Amos Brown 1, William Wiley 1, Lyons 1, Mca 1, New York 1, The Vehemence 1, Sunnyvale 1,
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  SFGTV2    [untitled]  

    September 30, 2012
    9:00 - 9:30pm PDT  

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wiley's retrospective, when he got up onstage to sing a song, 270 people put on the cat. >> it is not just a bookstore. it is a store. can you talk us through some of your favorites? >> these are made in china, but they are made out of cattails. >> these pieces of here, you have a whale head and various animals and their health over there, and they are jewelry. >> we do fund raisers for nonprofits, so we are doing a project for the magic theater, so there are some pretty funny cartoons. they are probably not for prime time. >> you sort of have a kind of holistic relationship where you might do merchandise in the store that promotes their work and practice, and also, prince for them. maybe we should go back and look
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at the print operation now. >> let's go. >> before we go into the print shop, i noticed some incredible items you have talked back here. what are we standing in front of? >> this is william wiley, only one earth. this is a print edition. there are only eight total, and what we wanted to do was expand the idea of printmaking. this is really an art object. there we go. >> besides the punball machine, what do you produce in limited edition? >> there is the slot machine. if you win the super jackpot, you have saved the world. >> what about work? >> the right design, it was three volumes with lithographs
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in each volume. the cab of count dracula with 20 lithographs inside and lined with beaver fur. really special. >> let's move on to the print shop. >> ok. the core of what we do is making things. this is an example. this is a print project that will be a fund-raiser for the contemporary music players. we decided to put it in the portfolio so you could either frame at or have it on your bookshelf. >> so nonprofits can come to you, not just visual are nonprofits, but just nonprofits can come to you, and you will produce prints for them to sell, and the profits, they can keep. >> the return on investment is usually four times to 10 times the amount of investment. this is for the bio reserve in
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mexico, and this is one of the artists we represent. >> you also make prints for the artists that you represent. over here are some large prints by a phenomenal artist. >> he writes these beautiful things. anyone who has told you paradise is a book of rules is -- has only appeared through the windows. this is from all over coffee. we are contract printers for all kinds of organizations all across the country. >> thank you very much for showing us around today. i really appreciate you taking the time to let me get better acquainted with the operation and also to share with our "culturewire" team.
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♪ >> welcome to hamilton recreation and aquatics center. it is the only facility that has an integrated swimming pool and recreation center combined. we have to pools, the city's water slide, for little kids and those of you that are more daring and want to try the rockslide, we have a drop slide. >> exercises for everybody. hi have a great time. the ladies and guys that come, it is for the community and we really make it fun. people think it is only for those that play basketball or swim. >> i have been coming to the pool for a long time now. it is nice, they are sweet.
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>> in the aquatics center, they are very committed to combining for people in san francisco. and also ensuring that they have public safety. >> there are a lot of different personalities that come through here and it makes it very exciting all the time. they, their family or teach their kids have a swim. >> of the gem is fantastic, there is an incredible program going on there, both of my girls have learned to swim there. it is a fantastic place, check it out. it is an incredible indication of what bonn dollars can do with our hearts and facilities.
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it is as good as anything you will find out why mca. parents come from all over. >> there are not too many pools that are still around, and this is one-stop shopping for kids. you can bring your kid here and have a cool summer. >> if you want to see some of the youth and young men throughout san francisco play some great pickup games, come wednesday night for midnight basketball. on saturdays, we have a senior lyons dance that has a great time getting exercise and a movement. we have all the music going, the generally have a good time. whether it is awkward camp or
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junior guard. >> from more information, visit >> hi. ok, thank you for joining us today. my name is malia cohen. i represent the southeastern neighborhood, affectionately known as district 10. i am very pleased everyone is here today. thank you for hosting us today
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and opening up your wonderful sanctuary. where are you? there you are. thank you very much. i appreciate that. i'd like to introduce mayor lee, who will talk to us about some of the proposals we will be presenting to you today to address some of the public safety challenges we have recently been experiencing in the southeastern part of the city. thank you very much, mayor. mayor lee: thank you. i want to also express my appreciation for the other supervisors that are here and also have been engaged with us. certainly, supervisor olague is here. supervisor wiener is here. there is an ongoing discussion about public safety.
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i also want to express my deep appreciation for our city's cloete community, the interfaith council, and my thanks for today, the pastor and his church and his staff for welcoming us all here in this very integral part of our city and all the other clergy that are here as well as the naacp, represented by a pastor reverend amos brown and his staff, along with the police chief, or public safety clusters, juvenile probation, a deprivation, community-based agencies, city services office, and the number of community groups that have engaged me and my staff and all of the supervisors are on this very serious question around public safety in our city. many of you have known and heard in the past couple of
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months my very deep concerns about our safety, particularly of our young kids, and particularly of our african- american kids. not everybody can be a gabby or an olympic hero. not everybody can do that. not everybody can participate in the 5000 jobs that we are creating in the internship programs that are paid that we signaled this summer. not everybody can be successful in everything that we do to try to set up those conditions for people to be successful. there are some who, unfortunately, touch our juvenile and adult probation criminal-justice system, and we try to find ways to correct that path and to create supportive mechanisms.
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we are rich in services in many ways with interventions as much as we can to redirect our youth or to help victims and their families as best we can. sometimes not perfectly, but the best we can to assist them in their recovery. and so it was right for me to talk about this in a very deliberate way, to talk to other mayors across the country and ask what they are doing to find out what is working and what is not working and then to bring back that conversation in a very direct way to our own communities here in san francisco. i know every person standing beside and behind the law of our communities, love this city. they would not be here unless they did, from the labor groups to become -- clergy groups to the community-based agencies, they really have a deep, deep love.
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i know it, and i know we have had these very sensitive discussions about these programs will have been done in other parts of the country, and i had a chance to review those. in agreement with our local leaders, in total agreement with the community-based agencies and civil rights organizations that have had a very delivered reason to engage me on this, we will not be implementing the stop and frisk programs or variations of that here in san francisco. [applause] we do not wish to be distracted from the real reason we are here. we love our kids. we love our families in the bayview whether they are in sunnyvale or alice griffith or potrero hill or in the mission. we love them so much that we
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have to do more to care for them. we have to find those connections. [applause] there are too many stories that we are hearing from our clergy when it is too late. when we are having those individual funerals, when our parents and their brothers and sisters are crying over things that have already happened, where the jobs that we are creating did not reach these unfortunate young kids or our police commissioners and police chief working in concert with adult probation, juvenile probation, did not quite get the person who signed these papers, put their names to it saying, "i will not go back to where our was found with a gun or associate with those very known individuals that are participating in gang mentalities." de sign those papers. yet, within days, they are
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found. we are not reaching them. we are not penetrating those kids. we have to step it up. this is why our supervisors and i have been talking very deliberately to come together with all our community groups to support our own san francisco plan about trying to get to these individuals and prevent crime from happening and prevent their lives from being destroyed. we created over 5000 jobs this summer. we cannot give jobs to dead kids. that is just the reality of it. no matter how often we try, these kids, if we do not get to the now, did not prevent their truancy in middle school, if we do not redirect their interest in how to resolve a problem that they have in an individual case or some hatred or something going on in their lives -- this is why we are investing in a three-pronged approach today
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that we wanted to announce. a san francisco-based program. the first -- we are going to interrupt the patterns that we see out there. and i need everybody's help to interrupt these lives that are being wasted. right now, what ever we are doing is not good enough to interrupt these patterns. i am going to ask the churches to step it up. i am going to ask all the law- enforcement to step it up. we have identified at least 100 to about 180 adults and young kids who have in most cases touched the criminal-justice system already, and we have to interrupt their lives right now. make sure the interruption is serious enough for them to pay attention, and then we have to do the two other parts of this program that are as essential. interruption is only temporary.
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we talked about that. we talked about how temporary that can be. not good enough to just incarcerated for a day or two in a juvenile detention or cause them to have a probation. that is not enough interruption. we have to step it up. we have asked the police commission and police chief to work with adult and juvenile probation, to do better predictor of policing in our communities, to work with all of us in the community to take a look at all the data we have, including anecdotal data, information that is given to us by people who are talking through their clergy or their friends or juvenile probation officers and others, not to squeal, but to get better information so we can predict where the crimes will be connected, again, in a very specific way. and we know some of those areas already. they happen over and over again,
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but predicted policing is about using the best data and the best systems we have, not only to respond with officers on the street, as sensitive as they can be, but we also have to predictably before the events happened saturate those areas with our probation officers, with our crime prevention, with our crn partners and others that can help provide deterrence. that is predictive policing. and then the most important part is community organizing, something that has never let me in all of the years and all the time that i have worked in public office here. it has always been about stronger community building. this is where our youth advocates, our school advocates, our family advocates, our victim
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advocates, all of our church going folks as well as people that are not going to go to church but might touch us on a community service basis point. we have to step it up in our community organizing and work even closer together to prevent and to provide alternatives before things happen to suggest dispute resolution and abilities to argue is fine. but fighting and using violence as the answer -- that is not an answer for anybody. [applause] so our san francisco approach, one that has been derived from all of these very hard meetings that we have had to face each
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other down and said if we are not for this other program that is happening in philadelphia, chicago, new york, what do we stand for here? what are we doing actively to turn the tide here? as these numbers tell us we are on an uptick. we have got to interrupt. we have got to have better predicted -- predictive policing with all the law-enforcement agencies and have better programs that penetrate the isolation and loss of hope that many of our youth and families are facing, and we have got to have stronger community organizing from the church, from all of the differt religious spaces in our community, and we have to build hope and faith in our young folks. we have jobs, and we have been told it is not just a job -- i can quote you numbers on and that we have jobs here, and all of our city agencies to come together, but it is about the
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training. it is about getting up every day, about having financial security, about creating hope that they can take care of others, and we have got to talk with the young girls of our community as well. not just young men. young girls as well. but they have to talk with each other and with us about how we can reach these young people, so they are not signing these probation forms, but that they really mean that they want to change their lives are around them. we have to have everybody's cooperation. the three-part program we are going to invest in. add to will be a budgetary priority, but also, certainly, this they are and our board of supervisors will work closely together to prevent more lives being lost -- this majyor but also to work with our housing authority and all our community partners, but it begins with
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national night out. i think it is very appropriate that not only myself but others are enjoying in all of our communities to express our support and look for our communities by being with everyone. it is not just one event. it has got to be every night. we have got to have these conversations that reach all these families that could be hurt or already are hurt. we have to have restorative justice on our side, so all the efforts may not sound brand-new, but they are at invigoration of where our hearts are, where our minds are, and where our commitment is to the rest of the city. thank you very much. [applause] >> all right, thank you, mr. mayor.
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also want to acknowledge president david chiu join us. supervisor kim is also here. thank you for your thoughtful words. a wonderful, great epiphany. thank you. what is critical is that we need to begin to interrupt this cycle of violence, and five key things i want to recognize with you, to share that we recognize the link between poverty and the lack of economic opportunity to the propensity to commit crime, and that the role the young men and women are playing in these incidents, that they are not exclusively just for men, i think that is a critical point. there are women raising our future generations. while we have significant city resources dedicated to violence prevention and response, they should be significantly
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coordinated and better utilize. i am proud to see so many of our service providers with us today as well as our community partners. it is not just about government. we need to make sure we have a comprehensive approach that is not just tailored to individuals and to individual communities but will most likely taylor the individuals that we know to be perpetrators of gun violence but also keeping in mind the relationship of their families. everyone is connected to a family, and it is the entire family unit we must begin to heal and provide research -- not research but out reached towards. we also need to better realize the opportunities for employment on all sectors, not just on the ground doing construction. without that, i would like to bring up our cheek, who after serving as captain of the bayview station is now our police chief. for a number of years, he
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intimately understands the challenges that we are facing as a community. thank you. [applause] >> thank you. with regard to the interruption, obviously, the police department will play a major role in that. in the first five months of 2012, we had 14 homicides by firearm. in the next to the vehemence, 15. we had more homicides in the last 60 days in san francisco by firearm than we did in the entire first half of the year. the shootings are the problem. the guns of the problem. i discussions with this entire group and many people behind the cameras, it is about getting to the guns and affecting some long-term changes so we are not revisiting this every three to five years. to that end, the police department will take our zone strategy that has been effective almost a decade by decade as we unfortunately suffer these spikes. we will use real-time
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information through a new web- based system the department just got to get out in front of the violence. we're working very closely with juvenile probation, adult probation, but role, the district attorney's office and more, all those in the room to arrive at the list that the mayor spoke up. we do not anticipate this list will be larger than 200 suspects that are on parole and/or probation. if you are on parole or probation, plan on seeing a police officer, a probation officer, for a prole every time we see you. we will be knocking on your door, seeing if you are compliant with conditions, and if you have a gun, i would suggest you turn it in either directly to law enforcement, or i know the fate community has offered to be a safe harbor. anyone who knows where there is a gun in san francisco, get it to somebody that can get it to us. if there's less guns on the streets, we will have less of
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gun violence. i know some people will say that the people that do not use the guns of the only ones that turn them in. it does not matter. many of the guns we come across are taken in burglaries and the like. we cannot have them on the street. by targeting particular neighborhoods where the violence is occurring and focusing on those individuals most likely to commit the violence and/or become victims, we believe we can get out in front of this right now. that is the case for the interruption. we will be blocking it. we will be working closely. i see many of our friends from the district attorney's office here, to vigorously prosecute those that are in commission of crimes, especially if you are on our list. we are one list you do not want to make. we will be trying to get those people off the streets for as long as we can, whether it is in county jail, prison, and then those folks that are not on the
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list -- we would love to work with you, as the mayor said, to get you into some productive, positive choices. jobs, more education, again, to try to break the cycle. we will be using the same system and, hopefully, where we can get to later to predict with the next violence they occur and deploy resources there so that we are efficient and even more so -- we are not random in our application of our efforts to eliminate this violence. all you have to do is look at the room. it is unbelievable the amount of people that are now in the conversation, and we need to stay in the conversation. even in -- even if this current state of violence subsides, it has positioned itself, and it will come back. we will be tracking our list and anyone else who makes the list forever. you go online now, you can always find it forever. if you make our lives, we will track you in and out of the justice system. if you leave the system forever,
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that is fine with us, too. if anybody wants to turn in a gun, we do not need an arrest. we just want the gun. like the mayor said, if you are worried about being proclaimed somebody who is a tattle tale, that your working with police, get that gun to the clergy. they have offered to receive it. and get it to law enforcement safely. i do not care if we get an arrest. we just want the guns. we know who we are looking for the other side of that. lastly, the mayor spoke to the kids. it is an absolute fact that 74% of our prison population did not finish high school. 82% of the crimes committed in this country are committed by high-school dropouts. at 4% of victims of homicide under 25 are high-school dropouts. it is about finishing high school and going on to better things. we will be working with the school district to find those kids that are most likely to be truant and/or at risk of not finishing high school.
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whatever we can as an entire city to get them across the high-school finish line. if we can do that, all those other numbers go away. think about the money that could be productively spent towards ending violence in the long-term here in san francisco. i cannot tell you how much i appreciate the mayor and the board of supervisors' leadership and the friendship and love that is in the room. we really, really appreciate the help. thank you. [applause] >> next, we will be bringing up the director of adult probation, chief windy still -- wendy still. [applause] >> thank you. adult probation department is working to create short and long term effective intervention to